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July Picks - Nonfiction

Superiority Burger Cookbook: The Vegetarian Hamburger Is Now Delicious Cover Image
$29.95
ISBN: 9780393253986
Availability: Backordered
Published: W. W. Norton & Company - June 5th, 2018

With more than 90 mouth-watering recipes, Superiority Burger Cookbook lays bare the secrets of America’s most talked-about vegetarian restaurant, in recipes as a simple as they are irresistible.

Along with recipes for a coterie of other delights—fresh, vegetarian, accidentally vegan, and always incredible—you’ll find out why Superiority Burger in New York City’s East Village is the hottest ticket in North America and the surrounding continents.

Superiority Burger is a cozy counter hangout filled with affordable, innovative food that is a protest against the idea that extraordinary fare is the exclusive domain of the elite. Now you can bring its blueprint for rebel compassion and culinary sophistication into your home with this cookbook; a must-read for home cooks who want something delicious, new, and imminently within their reach. The book is divided into six flavorful sections—Sandwiches, Cool Salads, Warm Vegetables, Soups and Stews, Sweets, and Pantry Recipes—and reveals the recipes for some of the restaurant’s favorites: the Sloppy Dave, Burnt Broccoli Salad, Russet Potato–Coconut Soup, Tahini Ranch Romaine Salad, and, of course, the now legendary Superiority Burger.


Abridged Classics: Brief Summaries of Books You Were Supposed to Read but Probably Didn't Cover Image
$19.99
ISBN: 9780062747853
Availability: Usually Ships in 3-7 Days
Published: Harper Design - June 5th, 2018

A collection of irreverent summations of more than 100 well-known works of literature, from Anna Karenina to Wuthering Heights, cleverly described in the fewest words possible and accompanied with funny color illustrations

Abridged Classics: Brief Summaries of Books You Were Supposed to Read but Probably Didn’t is packed with dozens of humorous super-condensed summations of some of the most famous works of literature from many of the world’s most revered authors, including William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, Emily Brontë, Leo Tolstoy, Jane Austen, Mark Twain, J.R.R. Tolkien, Margaret Atwood, James Joyce, Plato, Ernest Hemingway, Dan Brown, Ayn Rand, and Herman Melville.

From “Old ladies convince a guy to ruin Scotland” (Macbeth) to “Everyone is sad. It snows.” (War and Peace), these clever, humorous synopses are sure to make book lovers smile.


The Weather Detective: Rediscovering Nature's Secret Signs Cover Image
$20.00
ISBN: 9781524743741
Availability: Click Title to See Location Inventory
Published: Dutton - June 5th, 2018

The internationally bestselling author of The Hidden Life of Trees shows how we can decipher nature’s secret signs by studying the weather.

In this first-ever English translation of The Weather Detective, Peter Wohlleben uses his long experience and deep love of nature to help decipher the weather and our local environments in a completely new and compelling way. Analyzing the explanations for everyday questions and mysteries surrounding weather and natural phenomena, he delves into a new and intriguing world of scientific investigation.

At what temperature do bees stay home? Why do southerly winds in winter often bring storms? How can birdsong or flower scents help you tell the time? These are among the many questions Wohlleben poses in his newly translated book. Full of the very latest discoveries, combined with ancient now-forgotten lore, The Weather Detective helps you read nature’s secret signs and discover a rich new layer of meaning in the world around you.


What Truth Sounds Like: Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America Cover Image
$24.99
ISBN: 9781250199416
Availability: Usually Ships in 3-7 Days
Published: St. Martin's Press - June 5th, 2018

A stunning follow up to Tears We Cannot Stop, another timely exploration of America's tortured racial politics

In 2015 BLM activist Julius Jones confronted Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton with an urgent query: “What in your heart has changed that’s going to change the direction of this country?” “I don’t believe you just change hearts,” she protested. “I believe you change laws.”

The fraught conflict between conscience and politics – between morality and power – in addressing race hardly began with Clinton. An electrifying and traumatic encounter in the sixties crystallized these furious disputes.

In 1963 Attorney General Robert Kennedy sought out James Baldwin to explain the rage that threatened to engulf black America. Baldwin brought along some friends, including playwright Lorraine Hansberry, psychologist Kenneth Clark, and a valiant activist, Jerome Smith. It was Smith’s relentless, unfiltered fury that set Kennedy on his heels, reducing him to sullen silence.

Kennedy walked away from the nearly three-hour meeting angry – that the black folk assembled didn’t understand politics, and that they weren’t as easy to talk to as Martin Luther King. But especially that they were more interested in witness than policy. But Kennedy’s anger quickly gave way to empathy, especially for Smith. “I guess if I were in his shoes…I might feel differently about this country.” Kennedy set about changing policy – the meeting having transformed his thinking in fundamental ways.

There was more: every big argument about race that persists to this day got a hearing in that room. Smith declaring that he’d never fight for his country given its racist tendencies, and Kennedy being appalled at such lack of patriotism, tracks the disdain for black dissent in our own time. His belief that black folk were ungrateful for the Kennedys’ efforts to make things better shows up in our day as the charge that black folk wallow in the politics of ingratitude and victimhood. The contributions of black queer folk to racial progress still cause a stir. BLM has been accused of harboring a covert queer agenda. The immigrant experience, like that of Kennedy – versus the racial experience of Baldwin – is a cudgel to excoriate black folk for lacking hustle and ingenuity. The questioning of whether folk who are interracially partnered can authentically communicate black interests persists. And we grapple still with the responsibility of black intellectuals and artists to bring about social change.

This book exists at the tense intersection of the conflict between politics and prophecy – of whether we embrace political resolution or moral redemption to fix our fractured racial landscape. The future of race and democracy hang in the balance.


Going Up the Country: When the Hippies, Dreamers, Freaks, and Radicals Moved to Vermont Cover Image
By Yvonne Daley, Tom Slayton (Foreword by)
$19.95
ISBN: 9781512600315
Availability: Click Title to See Location Inventory
Published: University Press of New England - June 5th, 2018

How the counterculture changed Vermont—and America


Going Up the Country is part oral history, part nostalgia-tinged narrative, and part clear-eyed analysis of the multifaceted phenomena collectively referred to as the counterculture movement in Vermont. This is the story of how young migrants, largely from the cities and suburbs of New York and Massachusetts, turned their backs on the establishment of the 1950s and moved to the backwoods of rural Vermont, spawning a revolution in lifestyle, politics, sexuality, and business practices that would have a profound impact on both the state and the nation. The movement brought hippies, back-to-the-landers, political radicals, sexual libertines, and utopians to a previously conservative state and led us to today’s farm-to-table way of life, environmental consciousness, and progressive politics as championed by Bernie Sanders.