Upcoming Events

  • Thursday, June 01 at (All day) to Thursday, August 31 at (All day)

    This summer, kids entering 4th-8th grade in the fall are invited to take the Reading Without Walls challenge! 

    National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature Gene Luen Yang started the Reading Without Walls program to celebrate reading and diversity by challenging children nationwide to read a book about a character who doesn’t look or live like them; read a book about a topic they don’t know much about; and/or read a book in a format that they don’t normally read for fun.

    Starting in June, come on in to any Phoenix Books location to sign up and get your Bingo card!  Sign-up begins June 1st, but feel free to join throughout the summer. Read books to achieve "BINGO:"

    • Complete 1 line or 4 corners and kids get a free advance reading copy (while supplies last).
    • Complete the outer border and enter to win a $25 gift card and other great prizes.
    • Complete the entire card and enter to win a $50 gift card and other great prizes

    Reading Without Walls is sponsored by Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group, the Children’s Book Council, Every Child a Reader, and the Library of Congress. 

     

    DATES:  June through August

    LOCATIONS:  All four Phoenix Books locations!

    AGES:  Children entering grades 4-8 in the fall.

  • Sunday, June 25 at 4:00 pm

    Join Malcolm Bell for a discussion of The Attica Turkey Shoot, in which Bell exposes New York State's cover-up following the slaughter of prisoners at the Attica Correctional Facility.

    ABOUT THE BOOKThe Attica Turkey Shoot tells a story that New York State did not want you to know. In 1971, following a prison riot at the Attica Correctional Facility, state police and prison guards slaughtered thirty-nine hostages and inmates and tortured more than one thousand men after they had surrendered. State officials pretended that they could not successfully prosecute the law officers who perpetrated this carnage, and then those same officials scurried for shelter when a prosecutor named Malcolm Bell exposed the cover-up.
    Bell traveled a rocky road to a justice of sorts as he sought to prosecute without fear or favor—in spite of a deck that the officials had stacked to keep the police from facing the same justice that had filled the Attica prison in the first place. His insider’s account illuminates the all-too-common contrast between the justice of the privileged and the justice of the rest.
    The book also includes evidence from recently uncovered tapes that Governor Nelson Rockefeller knew his order for troopers to attack could cost the lives of hundreds of inmates and all the hostages. The Attica Turkey Shoot highlights the hypocrisy of a criminal justice system that decides who goes to prison and who enjoys impunity in a nation where no one is said to be above the law.

    “We are the jury as Mr. Bell presents clear evidence of a police riot in retaking Attica, of monstrous inhumanity in the aftermath, and of a subsequent cover-up emanating from the highest levels of government…. A courageous Mr. Bell reveals the shocking details of his long and arduous journey towards justice.”
    —Martin Sheen, actor and political activist

    “My book simply couldn’t have been written, nor could Attica’s many victims received any sort of justice, without the bravery that Malcolm Bell showed long ago when he blew the whistle on the state’s efforts to protect law enforcement ugliness during the retaking of that prison on Sept.13, 1971. . . . It is a real gift to us all that Malcolm’s . . . firsthand account of how [the Attica prosecution] unfolded, is being published once again.”
    ―Heather Ann Thompson, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy

    “Malcolm Bell tells a story America desperately needs to know…. The Attica prison rebellion… the Presidential ambitions of one of the nation’s wealthiest men, public fear and hatred of imprisoned convicts, police murders followed by weeks of torture and brutality, form the caldron in which a lawyer’s character was to be tested…. Malcolm Bell has written a bristling narrative, faithful to fact, full of hot emotion and cool reason in which conscience born of love prevails. Read it. ”
    —Ramsey Clark, former Attorney General of the United States

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR:  Malcolm Bell, a former corporate litigator, decided in mid-career to seek greater fulfillment by pursuing criminal law. While serving as a New York State prosecutor, he bravely blew the whistle on the state’s refusal to hold law officers accountable for the extensive torture and murder that they committed during the 1971 Attica prison riot. He lives in Weston with his wife, Nancy.

     

    DATE:  Sunday, June 25th at 4pm

    LOCATION:  Phoenix Books Misty Valley in Chester

    ADMISSION:  Free and open to all.

  • Tuesday, June 27 at 7:00 pm

    Join Sarah Healy to celebrate the launch of The Sisters Chase!

    ABOUT THE BOOK:  A gripping novel about two sisters who are left homeless by their mother’s death and the lengths the fierce older sister will go to protect her beloved young charge.
    The hardscrabble Chase women—Mary, Hannah, and their mother Diane—have been eking out a living running a tiny seaside motel that has been in the family for generations, inviting trouble into their lives for just as long. Eighteen-year-old Mary Chase is a force of nature: passionate, beautiful, and free-spirited. Her much younger sister, Hannah, whom Mary affectionately calls “Bunny,” is imaginative, her head full of the stories of princesses and adventures that Mary tells to give her a safe emotional place in the middle of their troubled world.
    But when Diane dies in a car accident, Mary discovers the motel is worth less than the back taxes they owe. With few options, Mary’s finely tuned instincts for survival kick in. As the sisters begin a cross-country journey in search of a better life, she will stop at nothing to protect Hannah. But Mary wants to protect herself, too, for the secrets she promised she would never tell—but now may be forced to reveal—hold the weight of unbearable loss. Vivid and suspenseful, The Sisters Chase is a whirlwind page-turner about the extreme lengths one family will go to find—and hold onto—love.

    “Sarah Healy’s The Sisters Chase will stay with me for a long time. It’s a heart-rending tale of survival filled with deftly revealed surprises and twists. In less skillful hands, Healy’s deeply flawed young protagonist, Mary, might have been unlikeable, but here she’s redeemed by her love and compassion for her younger sister Hannah. In fact, I ached for Mary as her plans to save herself and Hannah fall apart and tension builds. Each chapter ends on a note of suspense and surprise that demands you turn the page. An exciting read!”
    —Diane Chamberlain, USA Today best-selling author of Pretending to Dance and The Silent Sister

    “Sarah Healy has created, in Mare and Bunny, characters so real and flawed my heart ached for them.... The Sisters Chase is exquisitely written and full of surprises, love and loss; it is clearly the work of a writer at the top of her game.”
    —Jennifer McMahon, author of The Night Sister

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR:  Sarah Healy is the author of Can I Get an Amen? and House of Wonder. She lives in Vermont with her husband and three sons.

     

    DATE:  Thursday, June 29th at 7pm

    LOCATION:  Phoenix Books Burlington

    ADMISSION: Proceeds from ticket sales will go to the Vermont Foodbank.  Your $3 ticket comes with a coupon for $5 off a copy of the featured book.  Coupons expire at closing the evening of the event.

    BENEFICIARY: Founded in 1986, the Vermont Foodbank has grown to be the state’s largest hunger-relief organization, serving Vermont through a network of food shelves, meal sites, schools, hospitals, and housing sites. The Foodbank’s mission is to gather and share quality food and nurture partnerships so that no one in Vermont goes hungry. In FY2016, the Vermont Foodbank distributed more than 12 million pounds of food to 153,100 Vermonters. The Vermont Foodbank, a member of Feeding America, is nationally recognized as one of the most effective and efficient nonprofits and food banks in the nation.

  • Wednesday, June 28 at 7:00 pm

    Join bestselling author Catherynne M. Valente for a talk on her new book The Refrigerator Monologues, a ferocious riff on women in superhero comics.

    ABOUT THE BOOK:  From the New York Times bestselling author Catherynne Valente comes a series of linked stories from the points of view of the wives and girlfriends of superheroes, female heroes, and anyone who’s ever been “refrigerated”: comic book women who are killed, raped, brainwashed, driven mad, disabled, or had their powers taken so that a male superhero’s storyline will progress. In an entirely new and original superhero universe, Valente subversively explores these ideas and themes in the superhero genre, treating them with the same love, gravity, and humor as her fairy tales. After all, superheroes are our new fairy tales and these six women have their own stories to share.

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR:  Catherynne M. Valente is a New York Times bestselling author of fantasy and science fiction novels, short stories, and poetry. She has been nominated for the Hugo, Nebula, and World Fantasy awards, and has won the Locus and Andre Norton award. She lives on a small island off the coast of Maine with her partner, two dogs, one enormous cat, a less enormous cat, six chickens, a red accordion, an uncompleted master’s degree, a roomful of yarn, a spinning wheel with ulterior motives, a cupboard of jam and pickles, a bookshelf full of folktales, an industrial torch, and an Oxford English Dictionary.

     

    DATE:  Wednesday, June 28th at 7pm

    LOCATION:  Phoenix Books Burlington

    ADMISSION:  Proceeds from ticket sales will go to the Vermont Foodbank.  Your $3 ticket comes with a coupon for $5 off a copy of the featured book.  Coupons expire at closing the evening of the event.

    BENEFICIARY: Founded in 1986, the Vermont Foodbank has grown to be the state’s largest hunger-relief organization, serving Vermont through a network of food shelves, meal sites, schools, hospitals, and housing sites. The Foodbank’s mission is to gather and share quality food and nurture partnerships so that no one in Vermont goes hungry. In FY2016, the Vermont Foodbank distributed more than 12 million pounds of food to 153,100 Vermonters. The Vermont Foodbank, a member of Feeding America, is nationally recognized as one of the most effective and efficient nonprofits and food banks in the nation.

  • Thursday, June 29 at 6:30 pm

    Join us for an evening of poetry featuring Roads Taken: Contemporary Vermont Poetry from Green Writers Press.  We'll be joined by contributors Megan Buchanan, Tamra Higgins, and Mary Jane Dickerson, as well as Green Writers Press founder Dede Cummings and Vermont Poet Laureate Chard deNiord.  Cummings will also share her new collection of poetry, To Look Out From.

    ABOUT THE BOOKS:
    Roads TakenWith its mystical landscape and fiercely self-reliant citizenry, Vermont has inspired poets from its earliest days. This anthology of contemporary Vermont poets represents a wide range of accomplished voices―both young and old, both renowned and relatively unestablished. Their poems offer news, in Ezra Pound’s words, that stays news, and they do so in a wide variety of forms and subjects. While there is no such thing as a particular brand of Vermont poetry, the poems in this volume claim Vermont as their place of origin, bearing witness to the remarkably rich and ongoing legacy of the state’s poetic tradition.  Roads Taken is edited by Sydney Lea, Chard deNiord, and Dede Cummings.

    “Vermont tempts poets to epiphany by staying silent, or cold, or flinty, or dark, ironizes their praise. Many people move to Vermont because of the idea of it, an idea that has proven remarkably durable over time: as these poems suggest, so powerfully do the daily necessities of living there, of surviving there, assert themselves. This is where Frost comes in: Frost’s poems are the great rural instruction manual for our neck of the woods. His influence is everywhere in the poems collected here, which so often take ‘nature’ not as an idyllic refuge but as a site of careful, strenuous, and repeated steps or actions. The Vermonters in this book come from and live all over. Roads Taken is a ‘constellation/of patches and pitches,’ proof to me that Vermont will always require the imagination of its citizens to exist.”  
    —Dan Chiasson

    To Look Out From
    "In To Look Out From, Dede Cummings takes good advantage of the imaginative fluidity that poetry offers. Even her poems of memory and family are driven by curiosity and enlivened by quick maneuvers and spritely turns. And she is careful never to leave the reader behind."
    —Billy Collins

    "Dede Cummings' poems in To Look Out From are breathtakingly vivid. Deeply felt, they often chronicle the relationship between self and the natural world, between self and others. These are New England poems that transcend New England. They are well-crafted testaments, often pastoral, to the cycles of life. At times they are elegiac and bittersweet, yet attentive in their hopefulness and trust in the Great Wonderments and mysteries. At times gracefully discursive and always brilliantly paced, they are poems given to recovery and renewal. This is a book I will read over and over."
    —Clarence Major

    ABOUT THE AUTHORS:
    (From left to right:  Megan Buchanan, Dede Cummings, Chard deNiord, Mary Jane Dickerson, and Tamra Higgins.)

    Megan Buchanan’s first full-length collection of poetry, Clothesline Religion, was just published by Green Writers Press. Her poems have appeared in such as journals as The Sun Magazine, make/shift, A Woman’s Thing, and numerous anthologies such as Dream Closet: Meditations on Childhood Space (Secretary Press, NYC). Born in California, she’s lived for long stretches in Ireland, the mountains of the southwest, and New England. Her work has been supported by the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the Vermont Arts Council, and the Vermont Studio Center. Megan is also a collaborative performer and dancemaker, and she most recently presented the interdisciplinary, collaborative performance project REGENERATIONS: Reckoning with and responding to the closing of Vermont Yankee. She currently lives in Guilford, Vermont with her two children. Visit the author’s website at www.meganbuchanan.net.

    Dede Cummings' poetry has been published in Mademoiselle, Connotation Press, Bloodroot Literary, and other magazines and online journals. Her poetry collection, To Look Out From, won the 2016 Homebound Publications Poetry Prize. She lives in Vermont with her family and runs the solar-powered home office for Green Writers Press.

    Chard deNiord is the Poet Laureate of Vermont and author of five books of poetry, most recently InterstateThe Double Truth, and Night Mowing. His book of essays and interviews with seven senior American poets (Galway Kinnell, Ruth Stone, Lucille Clifton, Donald Hall, Robert Bly, Jack Gilbert, and Maxine Kumin) titled Sad Friends, Drowned Lovers, Stapled Songs, Conversations and Reflections on Twentieth Century American Poets was published by Marick Press in 2011. His poems and essays have appeared widely in such journals and anthologies as The Pushcart Prize and Best American Poetry, the Kenyon Review, The New England Review, The American Poetry Review, The New Ohio Review, AGNI, The Harvard Review, The New York Times, Ploughshares, and Salmagundi. He is the co-founder and former program director of the New England College MFA Program in Poetry and a trustee of the Ruth Stone Trust. For the past 19 years he has taught English and Creative Writing at Providence College where he is Professor of English. He lives in Westminster West, Vt. with his wife, Liz.

    Mary Jane Dickerson taught in the English Department at the University of Vermont from 1966 to September of 2000 and retired as an Associate Professor Emerita of English.  In her final teaching years, she was invited to Japan and to South Africa as a visiting scholar for her work on women writers and African American studies. Since her retirement, Mary Jane has taught an annual class on reading and writing poetry at her local library. She has published two volumes of poetry, Tapping the Center of Things, and Water Journeys in Art & Poetry with artist Dianne Shullenberger in 2015. Mary Jane also serves on the University of Vermont Foundation Board’s Leadership Council, the Board of Advisors to the Fleming Museum, The Retired Faculty and Staff Organization Board, and various civic boards in Jericho Center, Vermont where she has lived for forty-eight years. In the fall of 2016, she was elected to become a member of the Vermont Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Tamra J. Higgins holds an MFA from the Stonecoast Writing Program, University of Southern Maine and an M.Ed. from Johnson State College. After teaching in Vermont public schools for 19 years, she founded Sundog Poetry Center, Inc., a nonprofit organization that promotes poets and poetry throughout Vermont. Her work has appeared in Prairie Schooner, Passagers, Modern Haiku and several other publications. Higgins served as President of the Poetry Society of Vermont for three years. She is the author of Nothing Saved Us: Poems of the Korean War (2014) and the chapbook, Tenderbellied (2016), and is also co-editor of Tasteful Traditions: A Collection of Cambridge History, Memories, and Family Recipes. You can find her poetry, blog, photography, and hand-felted work at tamrajhiggins.com. She lives in Jeffersonville, Vermont.

     

    DATE:  Thursday, June 29th at 6:30pm

    LOCATION:  Phoenix Books Rutland

    ADMISSION:  Free and open to all.

     

  • Thursday, June 29 at 7:00 pm

    Join Paul Graham for a discussion of In Memory of Bread, a deeply personal account of the emotional and physical struggles of a beer-brewing, bread-baking, wheat-loving guy who nearly dies as a result of a severe undiagnosed wheat allergy, how he copes with the loss of these staples, and what he discovers about modern industrialized wheat.

    ABOUT THE BOOK:  When Paul Graham was suddenly diagnosed with celiac disease at the age of thirty-six, he was forced to say good-bye to wheat, barley, rye, oats, and more. Gone were some of his favorite hobbies, including brewing beer with a buddy and gorging on his wife’s homemade breads. Struggling to understand why he had become allergic to so many dietary staples, Graham researched the modern production of wheat and learned that not only has its structural makeup been altered but it is also commonly added to thousands of processed foods that serve as fillers, stabilizers, and dyes. He turned to community agriculture and locavorism both to fill the void left by his previous wheat-heavy activities and to secure unprocessed, and therefore uncontaminated, whole foods.

    With In Memory of Bread, Graham beautifully weaves together his personal loss with the realities of modern agriculture, creating a touching narrative for anyone struggling with a gluten allergy or interested in the state of our food system today.

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR:  Paul Graham is an associate professor of English at St. Lawrence University in upstate New York, and his essays have appeared twice in the Best Food Writing anthology (2012 and 2013). Graham lives with his wife and two German shepherds in rural New York on the Canadian border. This is his first book.

     

    DATE:  Thursday, June 29th at 7pm

    LOCATION:  Phoenix Books Burlington

    ADMISSION: Proceeds from ticket sales will go to the Vermont Foodbank.  Your $3 ticket comes with a coupon for $5 off a copy of the featured book.  Coupons expire at closing the evening of the event.

    BENEFICIARY: Founded in 1986, the Vermont Foodbank has grown to be the state’s largest hunger-relief organization, serving Vermont through a network of food shelves, meal sites, schools, hospitals, and housing sites. The Foodbank’s mission is to gather and share quality food and nurture partnerships so that no one in Vermont goes hungry. In FY2016, the Vermont Foodbank distributed more than 12 million pounds of food to 153,100 Vermonters. The Vermont Foodbank, a member of Feeding America, is nationally recognized as one of the most effective and efficient nonprofits and food banks in the nation.

  • Saturday, July 01 at (All day) to Sunday, July 30 at (All day)

    Where’s Waldo? In Rutland, of course!  The iconic children’s book character in the striped shirt and black-rimmed specs is visiting twenty-five local businesses throughout our community this July. Find Waldo Local is a great summer vacation activity and a wonderful way to support local businesses and the Shop Local movement in our community, including these partners:

    • Boys and Girls Club, 71 Merchants Row
    • Timco Jewelers, 59 Center Street
    • Rutland Optical, 28 Center Street
    • Wonderfeet Kids Museum, 11 Center Street
    • Rutland Area Food Co-op, 77 Wales Street
    • Handcarved by Ernie, 26 Center Street
    • Frogs and Lily Pads, 25 Center Street
    • Vermont Truffle Company, 37 Center Street
    • Bookmobile, 17 Center Street
    • Fruition, 56 Merchants Row
    • Rutland Chamber of Commerce, 50 Merchants Row
    • The Bakery, 122 West Street
    • Pyramid Holistic Wellness Center, 120 Merchants Row
    • Clay's, 67 Merchants Row
    • Raw Honey Apparel, 5 Center Street
    • McNeil & Reedy, 81 Merchants Row
    • Castleton Downtown Gallery, Center Street Alley
    • Avanti Unisex Hair Salon, 52 Center Street
    • Rutland Free Library, 10 Court Street
    • Col Cycling, 32 Merchants Row
    • Home Alternatives by Kindred Spirit, 116 West St.
    • Same Sun, 24 Center St.
    • Black Moon Games, 7 Evelyn St.
    • Speakeasy Cafe, 67 Center St.
    • ...and, of course, Phoenix Books Rutland, 2 Center Street

    Anyone who wishes to participate can pick up a “Find Waldo Local in Rutland!” passport, which contains the names of all the participating sites, and get their passport stamped or signed for each Waldo they spot. Collecting store stamps or signatures at twenty or more businesses will entitle diligent seekers entry into a grand-prize drawing on July 30, with the top prize being a six-volume deluxe set of Waldo books.

    This year marks the thirtieth anniversary of the Where’s Waldo? books. Martin Handford’s collections of crowd scenes swept the world in the late eighties, and since then have held a cherished spot on bookstore shelves the world over. There are now over 67 million Waldo books in print worldwide, and they’ve been translated into over thirty languages. An entire generation has grown up searching for Waldo and his cast of wandering companions. To celebrate such a special milestone, Waldo’s friend Wenda will also be hiding in Phoenix Books Rutland! Participants of Find Waldo Local will have double the fun searching for both Waldo and Wenda all month long.

    Once again, in celebration of Waldo’s longevity and popularity, his American publisher, Candlewick Press, is teaming up with the American Booksellers Association and two hundred and fifty independent bookstores across the country for some hide-and-seek fun to encourage communities to patronize their local businesses. There is no charge to participate, and the hunt lasts for the entire month of July.

  • Wednesday, July 12 at 7:00 pm

    Join Tyrone Shaw for a discussion of his book, Bastard Republic: Encounters Along the Edge of Fallen Empire.

    About the Book: In the best traditions of literary journalism, Bastard Republic takes us inside two of the defining developments of the 20th century—the collapse of communism in Europe and the implosion of the Soviet Union.  Through a compelling mix of memoir, reportage, history and travel writing, this collection of immersion essays accomplishes what facts alone cannot by drawing us into the lives of people propelled towards a future of sudden, rough transformation. Shaw probes recent history through their voices as they struggle for identity and equilibrium amidst revolution and massive social upheaval. Their echoes linger long after the last page of this book is turned.

    "In his deeply satisfying Bastard Republic, Tyrone Shaw discovers a new world within our own, entire countries that seem to have slipped off the geopolitical map and into the deep crevasse of post-Soviet fallout. He plunges us into this obscure region with a vitality and verve that awakens us to its struggles and its improbable, bursting humanity. Again and again Shaw's sharp-eyed prose conveys the rich complexity, the mystery, and-especially now-the relevance of this region at the brink."
    -Jacob White, author of Being Dead in South Carolina

    "Bastard Republic is a thrilling ride. It had me in its clutches from the first page, and didn't let go until the last. Here is literary journalism of the highest order, informative, compelling, and utterly readable. Masterfully combing historical events, personal narrative, and the keenly-observed changing political climate of post-Soviet era Eastern Europe, this book is a marvel."
    -Jensen Beach, author of Swallowed by the Cold

    "Tyrone Shaw's Bastard Republic is a raconteur's blend of reportage and cultural anthropology. This is not a breezy, drive-through travelogue. Shaw knows his territory intimately. Through richly textured scenes and brilliant exposition, he brings alive the painful contradictions that define this troubled and troubling eastern flank of Europe."
    -Tony Whedon, author of A Language Dark Enough

    "Why is the individual perspective so compelling, and even necessary, when deconstructing world history? Because how else to know the human, personal consequences when superpowers run roughshod over the people they control? Shaw, as a journalist, does more than merely cover the tragic history of Moldova. His personal narrative intersects with global events of epic proportions. This stunning and important book is a lesson in world history as well as a tale about what happens to the human heart when it struggles against power run amok."
    -Sue William Silverman, author, The Pat Boone Fan Club: My Life as a White Anglo-Saxon Jew

    About the Author: Tyrone Shaw is an associate professor of writing and literature at Johnson State College in Johnson, Vermont, where he directs the Communications and Community Media program. He received an MFA in creative nonfiction from Vermont College and has taught overseas in Romania, Serbia, Moldova and Latvia, sometimes as a Fulbright Specialist. His work has appeared in journals such as Saranac Review, Green Mountains Review, and The Truth About the Fact.

     

    DATE:  Wednesday, July 12th at 7pm

    LOCATION:  Phoenix Books Burlington

    ADMISSION: This event is free and open to the public.

    This event is a part of our Local Authors' Program.

  • Thursday, July 13 at 7:00 pm

    Join Tony Whedon, Barbara Murphy, and David Cavanagh for an evening of poetry.

     

    ABOUT THE HATCHECK GIRL AND TONY WHEDON:
    Tony Whedon’s new book The Hatcheck Girl vividly describes border crossings where language, culture and states of consciousness collide. In these richly layered poems about jazz, most of the musicians we meet are sidemen: few are famous, most are notorious. They’re united, as he says in his opening poem “The Tradition of the New,” by their devotion to the music and by their appetite for a note, a phrase to “make it new . . . over and over.” Whedon is a poet of historical juxtaposition: in “The Peacocks” we meet both trumpet player Chet Baker and Italian Baroque painter Michelangelo Caravaggio on a lonely beach outside Naples. In “Head Wound” Whedon’s narrator, an expat jazz musician who’s suffered a head wound in WW II France, contemplates the beauty of late-14th Century illuminated manuscripts. Some poems in The Hatcheck Girl feature women – Whedon’s opera singer sister dying of cirrhosis in Manhattan, an aging torch singer in Jacksonville, a young, green female pianist in Paris – struggling to survive in a male-dominated art form. Others depict the lives of musicians who scuffle for gigs in out-of-way clubs because they both love the music and don’t know what else to do. Robert Pinsky has praised Tony Whedon’s “masterful verbal music,” and in The Hatcheck Girl Whedon, a jazz trombonist, is in command of the medium. His new collection is full of brilliant improvisational surprises.

    Tony Whedon is the author of the poetry books Things to Pray to in Vermont and The Falklands Quartet, and the poetry chapbook The Tres Riches Heures. His poems and essays appear in Harpers, American Poetry Review, Iowa Review, Prairie Schooner, Sewanee Review, Ploughshares and over a hundred other literary magazines. His essay collection A Language Dark Enough: Essays on Exile won the Mid-List Press award for Creative Nonfiction. Tony is a working trombone player and the leader of the poetry/jazz ensemble PoJazz. Along with Neil Shepard, he founded Green Mountains Review. He lives with his wife Suzanne in Montgomery, Vermont.

     

    ABOUT ALMOST TOO MUCH AND BARBARA MURPHY:
    Barbara Murphy's Almost Too Much both tactfully and relentlessly interrogates our human experience in these dehumanizing times. There's not a sliver of false hope in these pages, but reading them, we catch glimpses of the paradox of our lives, that 'The sound of geese /overhead, their thin cries clear /as night through the ceilings and roof / of the house, is either the saddest /sound [we] will ever know / or one of great lifting joy.' Barbara Murphy's quietly brilliant poems move us readers toward usable truth," says David Huddle.

    Barbara Murphy's work has appeared in several literary journals including New England Review, Green Mountains Review, The Threepenny Review, and Michigan Quarterly Review. She was nominated for a Pushcart Prize and is the recipient of a Vermont Council on the Arts fellowship. Murphy has worked as president of Johnson State College in Vermont since 2001 and has been recognized for her leadership roles in higher education. She lives and works in northern Vermont with her husband Tom Garrett.

     

    ABOUT STRADDLE AND DAVID CAVANAGH:

    The poems in David Cavanagh’s Straddle explore the perils and possibilities in living on borders, both physical and psychic. They probe the inner/outer balance we all struggle to maintain. They straddle the challenges of daily life, try to reconcile contradictions, and find a measure of grace. Whether dealing with love, the environment, loss of loved ones, gun violence, relations between nations, or email from the Beyond, the poems brim with fresh language and clear vision.

    David Cavanagh’s four books of poems include Straddle, The Middleman, and Falling Body, all from Salmon Poetry of Ireland, and Cycling in Plato’s Cave, from Fomite Press. David’s poems have appeared in many journals and anthologies in the U.S., Ireland, the U.K., and his native Canada. His work has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and been supported by grants from the Vermont Arts Council and the Canada Council for the Arts. He works for Johnson State College and lives in Burlington.  

     

    DATE:  Thursday, July 13th at 7pm

    LOCATION:  Phoenix Books Burlington

    ADMISSIONProceeds from ticket sales will go to the Vermont Foodbank.  Your $3 ticket comes with a coupon for $5 off a copy of the featured book.  Coupons expire at closing the evening of the event.

    BENEFICIARY: Founded in 1986, the Vermont Foodbank has grown to be the state’s largest hunger-relief organization, serving Vermont through a network of food shelves, meal sites, schools, hospitals, and housing sites. The Foodbank’s mission is to gather and share quality food and nurture partnerships so that no one in Vermont goes hungry. In FY2016, the Vermont Foodbank distributed more than 12 million pounds of food to 153,100 Vermonters. The Vermont Foodbank, a member of Feeding America, is nationally recognized as one of the most effective and efficient nonprofits and food banks in the nation.

  • Saturday, July 15 at 11:00 am

    Enjoy your Saturday morning with a reading of the children’s book The Watermelon Seed, by Greg Pizzoli.  With perfect comic pacing, Greg Pizzoli introduces us to one funny crocodile who has one big fear: swallowing a watermelon seed. After we read together, we'll make mini watermelon cakes decorated with whipped coconut cream and fruit.

     

    DATE:  Saturday, July 15th at 11am

    LOCATION:  Phoenix Books Burlington

    ADMISSION:  All ages are welcome to this free event.

    COSPONSORS:  Thank you to City Market for joining us in presenting this event! City Market, Onion River Co-op is a community-owned grocery store with over 10,500 Members, selling wholesome food and other products while building a vibrant, empowered community and a healthier world, all in a sustainable manner. Located in downtown Burlington, Vermont, City Market provides a large selection of local and organic foods and thousands of Vermont-made products.

Pages

Storytime at Phoenix Books

Enjoy timeless tales and new adventures with your little ones.  Wondering what we'll read?  Each week, we'll choose a new picture book, a classic, or a staff favorite.  See you there!

Burlington: Saturdays at 11am (Want to double check on a particular date?  Call us at 802-448-3350.)

Essex:  Saturdays at 11am (Call 872-7111 for more info.)